Drink of the Week: Anchor’s new Estonian-style ale

Here’s the deal:

Anchor Brewing Company’s Zymaster No. 6: Saaremaa Island Ale is inspired by Anchor Brewmaster Mark Carpenter’s journey to this Estonian island in the Baltic Sea. Inhabited for over 8,000 years, Saaremaa has been occupied by Germany, Denmark, Sweden, czarist Russia, and the Soviet Union. Its culture is a rich and fascinating melting pot. Yet few outside of Estonia have ever experienced its uniquely native beers. Mark enjoyed them so much that he not only brought back his memories of Saaremaa but some brewer’s yeast, as well. Inspired by Mark’s Estonian beer journey, Anchor’s Zymaster No. 6 takes you on a journey to Saaremaa by way of San Francisco.

“My wife and I were traveling through the Saaremaa Island countryside and we stopped at a bar,” said Anchor Brewmaster Mark Carpenter. “I asked for a local draught beer and the unfiltered brew I was served was completely unique. It was the native yeast that intrigued me and ultimately become the inspiration for Zymaster No. 6. After returning to San Francisco, the Estonian yeast was isolated and cultured becoming the cornerstone of our pale ale which is complimented by the medium bitterness from Northern Brewer, a favorite hop here at Anchor. The result is a one-of-a-kind brew that transports me back to that countryside bar. We hope you’ll enjoy this beer journey, as well.” [link]

I had it the other day at the Tradesman and it was pretty interesting (and paired well with the burger with peanut butter and cheese). Had no idea of its Estonian origins until I thought to look it up just now. Cool story, Anchor!

Drink of the Week: The Hennychata (aka the Horchennessy)

It’s horchata + Hennessy, what more do you need to know? Could there possibly be a more baller drink?

Available at La Rondalla. (Also available, the thing where you get a mini Corona tipped into your marg. Margaveza aka beergarita. Not too shabby.)

[via Andrew Dalton on Instagram]

Drink of the Week: Orange-and-black tallboy-and-a-shot combo

Stiegl Radler and a shot of Fernet Branca! Go Giants!

(Available at Pop’s Bar and probably other bars.)

[via Jess]

Drink of the Week: Newfangled variation on classic SF drink the Bottom of the Bay

If you haven’t had a Bottom of the Bay, check out the Bottom of the Bay.

This week’s Drink of the Week is a variation, which we tried last night for the first time. Instead of the draft Drake’s Imperial Stout, we used the new Narwhal Imperial Stout from Sierra Nevada. And instead of Fernet Branca, we used Fernet Lazzaroni (purchased over the weekend at Royal Cuckoo Market, along with some Swedish Punsch.) And instead of dropping a shot of the Fernet into the stout, we just poured a little in.

It was pretty damn good. Especially now that winter’s here ;)

Now let’s rock:

Drink of the Week: The SF Lager at Southern Pacific

It’s Anchor Steamy but kinda different. Refreshing on a hot summer day, and probably refreshing on a muggy rainy day too. Hella good.

Drink of the Week: Beautiful homemade bloodies

Fucking beautiful right? Mmmm.

[via Tegan]

Drink of the Week: The ‘Fernet About It’ at VSR

It’s Fernet, vermouth, agave and orange bitters I think? A nice lady at the bar recommended it and it was awesome. (Not quite as good as Fernet all by itself, but it was a nice change of pace last night.)

(And yeah, I just called Virgil’s Sea Room “VSR.”)

Now let’s rock:

Budget yachting

I was hella blessed to be asked to make a guest appearance this morning on Roll Over Easy (the finest morning radio broadcast on the planet), and during the show I talked about how much I like to get on the Oakland-Alameda ferry and order some gins ‘n’ tonics and take in the gorgeous views of the Bay Bridge and the Port of Oakland and everything.

And then our pal Ben Russo figured out what to call it:

Here are scenes from my last two budget yachting trips btw:

P.S. One time in a “Drink of the Week” column, I explained why to have gins ‘n’ tonics on boats.

Drink of the Week: Herbsaint shots

I’m not totally sure it was actually a good idea, but it was fun. Here’s info:

Herbsaint first appeared in 1934.[1] It was the creation of J. Marion Legendre and Reginald Parker of New Orleans, who learned how to make absinthe while in France during World War I.[1] It first went on sale following the repeal of Prohibition, and was unique in its category as an absinthe substitute, as opposed to a pastis.[1] Herbsaint was originally produced under the name “Legendre Absinthe”, although it never contained Grande Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium). The Federal Alcohol Control Administration soon objected to Legendre’s use of the word “absinthe”,[2] so the name was changed to “Legendre Herbsaint”. The Sazerac Company bought J.M. Legendre & Co. in June 1949. Herbsaint was bottled at 120 proof and 100 proof for many years, but the recipe was modified in the mid-1950s, when Herbsaint began being bottled at 100 proof and 90 proof. By the early 1970s the 100 proof variation was discontinued, and the 90 proof version remains the predominant Herbsaint available today. In December 2009, the Sazerac Company reintroduced J.M. Legendre’s original 100 proof recipe as Herbsaint Original.[3]

The name Herbsaint originates from “Herbe Sainte” (Sacred Herb), the French/Creole term for Artemisia absinthium and except for the letter r is an anagram of absinthe. [link]

Omg I love anagrams.

Drink of the Week: The NASCAR Negroni

Duvel and Campari over ice, twist of orange. (Why Aperol when you can Campari?)