From the ashes of Adobe Books: Adobe Cooperative

Adobe Books has long struggled with rising rents on their block of 16th St. near Valencia. But what started as a goodbye party for  this past Wednesday quickly turned into a welcome party for the next incarnation: Adobe Cooperative. No, it’s not going to be a place to get free Photoshop tutoring. Actually, I’m not quite sure what it will be.

A group lead by Rainbow Grocery‘s Jeff Ray will take the helm from long-time owner Andrew McKinley and they will be implementing a new business model. Here’s what one of the new guys had to say:

“Andrew has run it as a community space more than a business. We’re not going to let it close, but we have to think of new models,” says another organizer, Kyle Knobel, who talks about the need for diversification – like selling vinyl and magazines; hosting popup shops; putting on events. “We’ll still have some books, but it’ll evolve.”

I guess you can’t run a book shop that just sells books anymore. Still, it should be interesting to see what pops up.

[via SFGate]

18 Responses to “From the ashes of Adobe Books: Adobe Cooperative”

  1. rr says:

    Their rent will be $8K/month — so they’ll need to sell approximately $16K/month of books, vinyl and magazines, etc to break even?

    The economic reality is daunting for any small business in this neighborhood. Interesting times.

  2. two beers says:

    The only legitimate Mission business model these days is venture capital-funded money-laundering/”restaurant” vanity projects. These crooks have unlimited dollars to play with, which is why retail prices in the Mission are unreal.

  3. Boney Bob says:

    At some point fairly soon, they’ll have to start soliciting tax-deductible donations from “progressive” corporations. Sounds like a good idea to me — put “bookstores” on a financial basis similar to that of public art. Hotel tax, maybe?

    • tres says:

      Many NYC neighborhoods have gone through similar economic changes. Creativity is still possible, but it will have to be combined with far more sophisticated marketing.

      Less conventional businesses will have to find other neighborhoods to colonize. They always do.

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