Too dangerous

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Our old pal zinzin, one of our earliest and most devoted commenters, left the Mission about 7 years ago, but he still goes to the gym here. Check this out:

my gym is at 16th & mission. i lived near that corner for almost 20 years. it’s the heart of sketchiness in sf. the blocks around it are a 24/7 open air drug & prostitution market. always has been. over the years, the sketch has been compressed down into the blocks immediately surrounding 16th & mission. the block where my gym is – mission between 15 & 16 – is particularly sketchy. big crowd of people – the same people – every day, and i go to the gym at 9am. commerce is clearly being done. mental illness is clearly on exhibit. it’s a crowd of almost exclusively black people (not too many black people live in the mission), many of them speaking spanish. i dont really have a horse in this race (so to speak – heroin being the main drug for sale) – i moved out of the hood 7 years ago – but I’m fascinated by the sociology. so, today, for the first time, i say more than ‘hi’ to one guy in this crowd who i see almost every day.

me: so dude, this is a big family here every day.
dude: yeah man, we got to get paid.
me: yeah i can tell there’s business going on.
dude: are you a cop?
me: dude you see me every day. you think I’m a cop?
dude: i have to ask.
me: i dont care what y’all do out here, but I’m amazed that the cops dont shut you down.
dude: nah, it’s live and let live with the cops unless there’s violence.
me: i never see any
dude: only at night. dont come through here at night.
me: i used to live right around the corner here.
dude: i would never live in this neighborhood. it’s too dangerous.

[Photo by Google Maps]

Dinner & Bikes

  • seven course gourmet meal
  • inspiring bicycle short films
  • conversation and Q&A
  • raffles, prizes
  • New Belgium beer

All for about $20.

In its 6th year, Dinner & Bikes is a month-long tour that brings people together to eat a huge vegan dinner and share bicycle stories, campaigns, and inspiration.

It’s presented by Joe Biel, Elly Blue, Joshua Ploeg and hosted by Mission Bicycle.

Joe Biel is the director of the feature documentary Aftermass: Bicycling in a Post-Critical Mass Portland as well as over 100 short films. He is the author of half-a-dozen books, including Beyond the Music. He founded Microcosm Publishing and has published over 350 nonfiction books, zines, and movies.

Elly Blue is the author of Bikenomics: How Bicycling Can Save the Economyand Everyday Bicycling: How to Ride a Bicycle for Transportation (Whatever your Lifestyle). She’s the marketing director of Microcosm Publishing, producing books and zines about all aspects of feminism, self-empowerment, and bicycle transportation.

Joshua Ploeg is the the traveling vegan chef. When not touring the world, he’s a personal chef and delighter of secret cafe goers in L.A. His 8th and newest cookbook is This Ain’t No Picnic: Your Punk Rock Vegan Cookbook.

 

Tickets here:

Friday, June 10, for Dinner & Bikes: Food, movies, and bicycle inspiration.

 

 

 

Drama Talk & Drinks: You’re Gonna Cry – “A piece about gentrification in the Mission that was gentrified out of the Mission”

Gentrification is a frequent topic of conversation around these parts. However, recently it’s felt like the tone of these conversations has shifted, from one of righteous indignation, to that of resignation. Two years ago DT&D had the good fortune to interview Eric Reid, Co-Founder and Artistic Director of Theater MadCap, who also used to run CELLSpace/Inner Mission SF before it was lost to The Beast on Bryant. Eric, partially inspired by Theater MadCap’s displacement, teamed up with HBO Def Poet and Youth Speaks co-founder, Paul S. Flores, to produce You’re Gonna Cry, a one man show about gentrification in the Mission in the 90s.  Their goal is to make the gentrification conversation a little more action oriented. So off we went to Union Square (since their art space was gentrified out of the Mission) for some Drama Talk and Drinks.

Katie: It wasn’t exactly what I thought it was going to be. I was expecting it to be more innovative, with more spoken word and poetry.

Brittany: Yeah, it felt more like it was going for an Anna Deavere Smith vibe, lots of monologues around a theme. Some of the characters that were created were super compelling. I loved the immigrant mother with her daughter finding the old microwave on the street. Or the old women selling books. I wanted to know their stories. But despite some bright-spots, the pacing was off, and the show dragged for me.

K: The pacing was definitely a problem for me too. The transitions between the different characters took too long, and some of the staging was just wonky, like when he played all 3 characters at the same time. I don’t envy Flores, it’s not an easy show.

B: There were some technical problems with the TVs that were distracting too. This is a one man show, shit needs to be tight, and it wasn’t.

K: I appreciate what they are trying to do though, It’s important to have this dialogue. I also really appreciate that they had the post-show discussion with an activist. You want theater to inspire action, and it’s great they’re helping to direct people’s frustration about gentrification in positive ways.

The Verdict: The show needs some tightening, but the message is on-point. Making yourself a more empathetic and informed San Franciscan while supporting local theater is not a bad way to spend a night. Go and stay for the discussion at the end.

The Drama Talk: A play about gentrification in the Mission couldn’t even take place in the Mission because of gentrification. That’s pretty intense. The production itself could have been tighter. Slow transitions and some tech mishaps meant it lost some of its momentum and therefore emotional impact. MadCap’s website encourages audiences to “Come for the play. Stay for the discussion.” and we really appreciated the dialogue that happened after the show. Each night has a different local artists or activist who leads the post-show talk, so check the list below since discussion will vary dependent on who’s leading:

May 14thAmy Farah Weiss – Homeless advocate.

May 15th – Norman will talk about wages and the struggle for gente to teach gente in the Mission.

May 20thAdriana Camarena – Local Mission activist and author.

May 21stEdwin Lindo – District 9 Supervisor candidate.

May 27thLuna Malbroux – Comedienne/Community activist.

The Drinks: Afterwards we went to Benjamin Cooper, which was literally right next to the theater entrance. Exit the building, make a left, then an immediate second left into an unmarked door, up the stairs to a small cocktail bar. When you enter go right and head to the back, there are usually a place to sit. And after a discussion about SF’s housing crisis you will need a strong drink.

You’re Gonna Cry runs through May 28th at The Phoenix Theater. Tickets are available through the MadCap website and are $20.

 

 

Modern family

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[via Molly]

Drama Talk & Drinks: The Capulet Ball – “There was still a boy to kill!”

DT&D has reviewed a We Players show before. Last summer we loved their site-specific Ondine at Sutro Baths. So when we heard about their season kick-off party, The Capulet Ball, we were intrigued. Katie was busy, so Brittany and Sam donned their best Shakespearean-Masked-Ball garb and headed out for a night of Drama Talk and Drinks.

Capulet-Ball

Brittany: So did you have fun?

Sam: Yeah, I had a blast.

B: I think that the show (the full production of Romeo and Juliet) is going to be good. The girl who was Juliet was great.

S: She had great energy. She really got the physicality of a teenager. She had no inhibitions, and couldn’t filter when Romeo was nearby. The balcony scene felt really genuine and fresh, and I don’t normally like Shakespeare since it so often feels stale.

B: Even though this was just a sneak-preview of the show that’s opening this summer, you really got a good sense of the characters. Even if you never saw the actors saying their lines, by just interacting with them- in dancing or making small talk- you could tell who they were.

S: The characters were really intimate with the audience. It reminded me of Sleep No More, where you don a mask and become part of the scene. I wish that it went longer.

B: Yeah, it was really short. It was supposed to go until 10 but it only went until maybe 8:45 before the action ended and people started to leave. Even the band wrapped up early.  I guess it’s good to leave the audience wanting more, but I thought it would be a longer production.

S: For the brief production it was, the costumes were phenomenal. The animal masks were haunting, they added something whimsical to the production.

B: It’s also fun that so many audience members got dressed up. There were some elaborate costumes and impressive masks. The show only worked because the audience bought-in. If you had come into that space with the audience wearing normal street clothes it would have been a very different experience. People dressed up, danced and interacted. That’s what made it fun, getting to be in character yourself.

S: I wonder if we could have convinced the band to keep playing, it ended so early and I wanted it to continue. There was still a boy to kill!

B: And a girl. And a few other people too.

S: Not enough death for an evening out.

The Verdict: The Capulet Ball is a fun way to support an innovative Bay-Area theater company. It’s not even the whole first act of Romeo and Juliet, so if you want to see the full play, hold out until R&J opens this summer. But if you want to have a very cool interactive theater experience, that lets you dress up and be part of the show, go to this. It’s pricey, but it supports a good cause, and drinks and light food are included.

The Drama Talk: We Players is great at site-specific work, and The Capulet Ball is no exception. The space for this production was perfect, and looking at the future venues, there are some neat places on the list. Production values are super high. Once you walk through the door and put on your mask you’re transported to the Capulet’s home and the party where Romeo and Juliet’s star-crossed paths first cross. It helps if you get dressed up, drink some mead, and go in with no inhibitions.

The Drinks: The party has an open bar, so we drank there. Wine, beer and mead only, but the pours are generous and flow all night.

There are only three more performances of The Capulet Ball, all in different parts of the Bay Area. They run through June 18th, and range from $75 for the show in Oakland, to $150 to the show in Calistoga (which includes dinner). Tickets are available through the We Players website: http://www.weplayers.org

Sam & Brittany In Masked-Ball Finery

Sam & Brittany in Masked-Ball Finery

A short poem about life in San Francisco these days

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By local poet Cassandra:

You’re not depressed you’re just living in San Francisco.

:(

[link]

[Photo by Polaroid SF, via eastbayside]

Now please enjoy these other short poems about life in San Francisco…

It’s a super beautiful day

Hey hey it’s a beautiful day

Drama Talk & Drinks: The Boys From Syracuse “Looked like James Franco”

Once on a road trip back from Yosemite, Brittany and friends Chad and Thais got on the subject of musical theater. During the course of that conversation the lesser known 1930s Rodgers and Hart musical, The Boys from Syracuse, came up as a topic. Brittany had never heard of it. Chad had it on his iPod. The inevitable happened and the car filled with show-tunes.

One of the passengers was not a musical theater fan, so after a couple songs a new DJ was appointed, but Brittany was intrigued. She knew the songs and recognized the plot (it’s a musical retelling of Shakespeare’s Comedy of Errors), but she didn’t know the show. When she found out there was a production of The Boys from Syracuse happening at Eureka Theater, she knew she had to take Chad and Thais with her for a night of Drama Talk and Drinks.

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Brittany: Thanks for joining me for Drama Talk and Drinks, what did you think of the show?

Thais: I loved it, I thought it was a blast.

Chad: I thought it was fun. I love music from the 1930s. It’s jazzy, brassy and just fun.

T: The performances were fun too.

B: I liked three leading women in particular (Abby Haug, Elise Youssef, and Erin Yvette). The guys…some of them were better than others.

T: The guys who played Antipholus looked like James Franco.

B: That’s so true! They looked exactly like a taller James Franco.

C: They didn’t really stand out to me. “This Can’t Be Love” didn’t sound the way I expected it to sound. It should be more romantic. I know it’s a farce, but they didn’t take the time for a more serious moment.

T:  I loved the two Dromios though! The choreography, the references to Groucho Marx. It was hilarious.

B: The Dromios were great, but I agree with Chad on the love songs. I was hoping for more love. These songs are such Broadway songbook classics, even though the show isn’t necessarily that well known, they come with certain expectations. Also I could have done without the dance breaks.

C: You can only see a grapevine so many times. They were having a good time though, which made it enjoyable to watch.

T: The women’s voices were lovely too.

C: “Sing for Your Super” was the stand-out song of the show. It made my night.

The Verdict: If you’re a fan of Rodgers and Hart and the Great American Songbook, you’ll probably enjoy this show. It’s got some great voices, fun songs, and great energy. If traditional musical theater makes you want to pull the car over and scream, skip it.

The Drama Talk: 42nd Street Moon, the company behind this show, is committed to restoring, preserving and producing rarely performed musicals. The Boys from Syracuse is one such ‘lost classic’, typical of 1930s American musical theater, when the genre was in it’s hey-day. If you know Rodgers and Hart’s music, you’ve heard some of the songs in this show, you likely just didn’t know where they came from.

It’s possible part of the reason the show has been lost is the overtly sexist messages throughout the show. The idea of women singing for their supper is more than a little regressive now. But just like those awkward things your grandparents sometimes say, it’s a product of its time, so you feel like you can’t blame the musical. The three female leads are incredibly talented. The costumes are great. It’s generally a fun time.

The Drinks: Opening night started early and ended early, so we needed to get dinner and drinks after the show. Although Kokkari across the street would have technically been more fitting, since the show is set in Greece, we didn’t have $100 to drop, so we went to Osha on the Embarcadero. The sweet drinks and the bright colors seemed a fitting end to a technicolor Broadway “forgotten classic”.

The Boys from Syracuse runs through April 17th at the Eureka Theater. Shows are Wednesdays & Thursdays at 7pm, Fridays at 8pm, Saturdays at 6pm and Sundays at 3pm. Tickets are available through the 42nd Street Moon website, and range from $22-$75, but Eureka theater is small enough, it really doesn’t matter where you sit for the show.

 

Sorta Secret Show

 

Rob and Lauren, formerly of the band He’s My Brother, She’s My Sister (not actually brother/sister but yes actually husband/wife) have a new project called KOLARS. They’re stopping by Mission Bicycle Company for an intimate acoustic show tomorrow before their sold-out Independent gig on Saturday. Free beer courtesy of New Belgium Brewing.

Friday 3/18. Doors at 7:30, show at 8:00. Limited tix available online and at the door. 766 Valencia, between 18th and 19th.

http://bit.ly/KOLARS