Happiness is…

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THIRTEEN HOUR HAPPY HOURS! Why limit happy to an hour? Bacon Bloody Mary’s, Irish Coffee, Mexican Coffee, Fresh OJ Mimosa…Pops Bar gets your morning going every day at 6am and keeps happy hour going until 7pm! So Rise N Shine, then kick back and unwind, Pops is your official starting point in the Mission.

This week’s entertainment line up at Pops Bar:

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Little Baobab is now a late-night African pizza joint!

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Capp Street Crap has the scoop:

Inspired by the success of Indian pizza in the city, Bissap Baobob owner Marco Senghor has converted his second space in the Mission into a pizza restaurant that offers three Senegal-inspired pies alongside traditional flavors.

Read on for lots more info. (It’s open “5pm-2am most days.”)

[Photo by Capp Street Crap]

Zine of street photography in Mexico by Bay Area legend Brian Brophy (aka the Tens), benefits Mexico City earthquake victims

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You love his photographs of San Francisco and the Bay Area. Now you can own a taste of the work he’s done down in Mexico, while also helping those in need:

All profits will be donated to Mexican earthquake relief efforts through Oxfam. Oxfam has pledged to direct 100% of donated funds to support services and relief and recovery efforts in affected areas. Please choose the product with the amount you would like to donate. If you would like to donate more than $100, please do it directly with an organization and send proof of payment to thetenssf@gmail.com and I will ship you a zine.

Zines are 40 pages of color photographs I took in Mexico from 2014 through 2017. Zines will ship beginning the first week of October.

Get yours here.

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Case of the Mondays?

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[Editors' note: DJ Nutzeffekt is an employee of Mission Mission, so maybe this is some kind of conflict of interest? No big deal though right?]

Well shake it off! We’re giving you another reason to love Mondays at Pops Bar. Introducing a brand new happy hour, NOT MY PLACE (In the 9 to 5 World), on 4th Mondays from 6-9pm. You’ll probably recognize our resident DJ Nutzeffekt from American Tripps. Tonight he is joined by special guest DJ Lizzy (Tuff Signals, BFF.fm). Expect Rock ‘n’ roll old and new, all vinyl with a special Oh Sees set to prep you for their show later in the week. Remember, when life gives you Monday, treat it to happy hour!

Check out this week’s full entertainment line up at Pops Bar:

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Drama Talk & Drinks: A Tale of Autumn – “A long philosophy lesson”

Bay Area Obie award-winning playwright Christopher Chen‘s latest work, A Tale of Autumn, just had its’ world premiere at Potrero Stage. One of DT&D favorite theater companies, Crowded Fire Theater, commissioned the work “a psychological rise-to-power fable”, so we knew we wanted to check it out for Drama Talk & Drinks.

Lawrence Radecker as Dave (left) and Shoresh Alaudini as Gil (right)  Photo by Cheshire Isaacs

Lawrence Radecker as Dave (left) and Shoresh Alaudini as Gil (right)
Photo by Cheshire Isaacs

Katie: What just happened? I was so excited for this show, and that was just…meh.

Brittany: I feel bad. For the first act I was like, “cool, I’m with you”. There were some good actors, a smart script exploring some cool concepts, but I wish it ended at the end of the first act. I mean, I know it didn’t make sense as an ending, but the whole second act felt like a long philosophy lesson. It totally lost momentum.

K: I agree, I just felt like the story could have been more concise. It was like we were being hit over the head with the concept that the ends can’t justify the means. Cool I get it. How is this helping to move the story along? There were a lot of words coming at me and it didn’t help me connect to the characters. A strong story is really important to me, without that I just stop caring.

B:  It wasn’t like the people in it weren’t talented, or the set wasn’t cool, the set was really cool. It was just over written. You can make a point without jamming it down people’s throats.

K: I agree. I don’t think I’ll be telling friends to run out and see this one, but I have for multiple other Crowded Fire shows. This is a piece that seems like it could use some work.

B: Love Crowded Fire though, they always do interesting, innovative work. This one was a bit too much like a lecture.

The Verdict:  If you are a Bay Area theater nerd, you should probably see it. Christopher Chen is a prominent local playwright, and this is the world premiere of his latest work. Otherwise, if you aren’t really into Bay Area theater and having your pulse on the local theater scene, this is probably one you can skip.

The Drama Talk: This is such a promising play, but needs some edits to live up to its potential.  There were lots of cool and smart things A Tale of Autumn explores  -  like what is the line between selfishness and self care, and should we as a society trust “benevolent” companies, but the story gets lost in the philosophizing in the second act. While this show has lots of bright moments, a cool set, and some great actors, it just collapsed under its own weight.

The Drinks: As always after a show at the Potrero Stage, we headed up the hill to Blooms for some drinks with a view.

A Tale of Autumn plays through October 7th at the Potrero Stage. Tickets range from $15-35 and can be purchased on their website. The company also offers the following discounts: Student Tickets are always $15! (Please bring i.d.). Seniors (65+), TBA/TCG Members: $3 off at checkout.Groups of 5 or more receive an automatic 15% savings at checkout

Drama Talk & Drinks: Taylor Mac A 24-Decade History of Popular Music – “WOW”

Ever since we got to see Taylor Mac perform a portion of A 24-Decade History of Popular Music at Curran Under-Construction we couldn’t wait for the full show to come back. Last Friday the wait finally ended, and we got to see the first six hour chapter of the show at the Curran- covering the first six decades of American history from 1776-1836. It made for some unforgettable Drama Talk & Drinks.

Taylor Mac, photo by Teddy Wolf

Taylor Mac, photo by Teddy Wolf

Brittany: SIX HOURS!

Katie: Crazy, right! I was worried it was going to brutal, but it wasn’t at all. It went fast.

B: It went so fast! I was surprised every time an hour ended.

K: The pacing was so well done and deliberate. Taylor really thought about the human condition. The flow of it, and the strategic audience participation at just the right moments. The show moved. I didn’t feel tortured in any way, and when it was over it was like ‘Oh….WOW! ‘

B: I had some anxiety going into the show. The idea of going into a six hour performance that doesn’t have any intermissions is kind of daunting. I was worried about having to pee, getting tired, getting hungry, getting bored. All of those things were taken care of, so none of that was a problem. It would be very easy for them to just be like f*-you it’s performance art, you’re supposed to be uncomfortable, but it’s clear they really cared about taking care of the audience.

K: It was also just an amazing show. I loved it. So unique, so fun, so engaging.

B: I’ve never seen a show like it, so I can’t even go about comparing it. Taylor is an amazing performer, so expressive, such a fabulous voice.

K:  I feel like this show made performance art so accessible. From the way Taylor engaged with the audience and shared personal stories, to the amazing costume design by Machine Dazzle, to the more contemporary arrangements of these historical popular songs by Matt Ray, the whole show felt so deeply relevant. It was fabulous, irreverent, smart, intellectual, artsy, and still deeply human. I was able to connect to it. Not like other performance art I’ve seen that I’ve felt alienated from.

B: The Curran is such a big space too, and somehow they managed to create a really intimate experience. They did audience participation better than any show I’ve ever seen. Taylor even called it out,  that audience participation can be really uncomfortable. Somehow they managed to create a space where it was just fun. They kept pushing audience boundaries, asking us to do stranger more intimate things, and by the end it truly felt like the audience was part of a community and building the show together – which is an amazing thing to accomplish.

K: What an undertaking. I can’t even imagine there’s so much more of this show to go.

B: I know! I thought I would be done after six hours, but now I really want to go back and see the other nights. Especially the last two installments which will have more contemporary music I’m more familiar with. This show does such a clear-eyed job deconstructing the history of oppression in America, and it would be fascinating to see songs I know turned on their head.

The Verdict: Go see this show! It’s one of the most remarkable pieces of theater we’ve seen.

The Drama Talk: Taylor opens the show telling the audience this is a “radical fairy realness ritual” and there isn’t really a better way to define it. Part drag performance, part concert, part performance art, part history lesson this show can’t be put into a box. It was workshopped over three years, in various configurations in New York. Culminating last year in a 24-hour performance of the show in full at Brooklyn’s St. Ann’s Warehouse. This San Francisco production, a collaboration between the Curran, Magic Theater, Stanford Live, and Pomegranate Arts (Taylor’s home theater) is the first showing where they’ve broken the 24 hour show into four six-hour blocks (1776-1836, 1836-1896, 1896-1956 and 1959-present) and shown it in its entirety over multiple days. It’s a remarkable testament to the company’s talent that six hours felt like no time at all. Using popular music from each decade Taylor explores the history of America and the systemic oppression which has been foundational to our society. All of this is done with such heart and levity, that you don’t even realize how deep the content is until you leave the theater. A really remarkable performance that you should see if you can.

The Drinks: The Curran sells drinks and food throughout the show, which you can bring into the theater, so that’s what we did. Each night is different, but there was both food and drink handed out to the audience by the Dandy Minions during the performance we saw as well, so you will be well taken care of. Just remember to pace yourself. In one moment this show feels like a raunchy drag performance, in the next it’s tackling issues like racism and sexism, so you don’t want to be wasted and miss some of the really smart critiques this show has to offer.

The last two chapters of this show are this coming weekend, (September 22 & 24) so if you want a chance to experience this amazing performance you need to go now. Tickets range from $285 to supposedly $49, but the cheapest we could find for single ticket purchase remaining were $99 tickets. You can buy tickets through the Curran website.

Extra Cheese

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Welcome the Mac & Cheese Collective to the Pops Bar family! Mac & Cheese bring artists together, throw dope parties, and bump certified bangers (in no particular order). This Saturday at Pops, MAC & CHEESE is going BIG with TRAP / FUTURE BEATS / HOUSE / FUNK / DISCO / PSYCHEDELIC / TECHNO / MUSIC YOU CAN GET DOWN TO. They’ve brought together some of the best local collectives, producers, DJ’s, and tastemakers to curate an all night dance party spanning ~all the genres~. And of course, free mac & cheese all night long if you RSVP now. Won’t you come and join us 🧀

RSVP for guaranteed entry, free food, and drink specials!

FEATURING:

Check out this week’s full entertainment line up at Pops Bar:

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Drama Talk & Drinks: An American In Paris – “who is this musical for?”

We have kicked off the Fall theater season with seeing the Tony Award winning musical, An American In Paris at SHN’s Orpheum Theatre. It’s a musical inspired by the 1951 film, which is full of George and Ira Gershwin songs. Brittany couldn’t make it, so she was replaced with our backup theater lover, Garrett.

Photo Credit: Matthew Murphy
An American in Paris Touring Company

Katie: So much dancing.

Garrett: Yeah, but the dancing is what I liked about it.

K: Really? There were great dancers and dance sequences for sure, but for me when I’m not interested in the story, the dancing feels like a filler. The dancing was beautiful, but there was just so much of it, and the show dragged on for me. The other aspect that made it drag for me was the weak male romantic lead (Jerry Mulligan, played by McGee Maddox), who was far from believable.

G: I think the show started off strong, but then the story didn’t hold up and it never quite took off for me. It felt like a forced love story and very old fashioned for a newly adapted script.

K: It felt like a super old American musical, which I can appreciate but don’t seem to have as much patience for anymore, I’m just over this style of storytelling. I mean, who is this musical for?

G: It feels like it’s for grandparents or someone who loves the nostalgia that you get from the old classic Gershwin songs, or maybe a very young person who loves to be visually stimulated and doesn’t need a complex well developed storyline.

K: I guess. I think we are just not the audience for this musical. I was underwhelmed. It felt stale and unimaginative. I wouldn’t recommend this to anyone between the ages of 20-50.

The Verdict: This old time feeling musical could be a great night out with parents or grandparents. The nostalgia from classic songs like “I Got Rhythm” and “They Can’t Take That Away From Me” is enjoyable. Don’t go to this show expecting something new and unexpected.

The Drama Talk: This Tony winning musical fell short when it came to imaginative, well developed storytelling, but didn’t disappoint in terms of music and choreography. Everything about this production, from the set to the costumes and actors, were just, well….fine, but nothing really stood out as exceptional. This felt like a big budget Broadway musical going through the motions and checking the standard boxes of what used to wow people. There is nothing new to see here.

The Drinks: Less than a block away there is a new beer and wine bar called Fermentation Lab. It wasn’t crowded or loud which made it a great place to grab a drink and talk about what we had just seen.

An American In Paris runs through October 8th at the Orpheum Theatre. There are $40 both virtual and in-person rush tickets available. You can check-out the SHN website for rush instructions. Goldstar also currently has tickets for $50-70.

 

Check out the very special special effects in this music video “I Don’t Know About Love” by Sob Stories

[via The Bay Bridged]

The Pops Files: UFOs love the Mission

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It should be no surprise when it feels like the entire world is trying to gain residence in our beloved Mission District, that we’d be just as a popular a hot spot for beings from out of this world. Alright so we took some creative license here, but it does turn out that California has the highest reported sightings of UFOs in the country.

On Thursdays from 1-8pm, we celebrate UFOs, Aliens, Nibiru, Planet X, Super Heroes, Ancient Aliens, Star Trek, Doctor Who and all of the classic Sci Fi from the 50s on at the Pops Files. Come watch real life UFO videos on our big screens and ponder the mysteries of the universe with us. Here’s a preview:

Check out this week’s full entertainment line up at Pops Bar:

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