Nice penmanship, Nuni

Did I pronounce that right?

(Aaaaand that makes three graffiti posts in a row, just like the old days! Good work, Ariel!)

What did the _______ ever do to you?

Our pal Simon, who took this photo, thinks they may have meant:

…police who turned up while we were tagging? [link]

Hehe.

Bird Haunters

UFO in the WC

Go big or go…

[via Jono Brandel]

A very special Mother’s Day fuck-you somewhere on Capp Street

Ouch. Happy Mother’s Day!

(Thanks, Amy!)

Get rich or get out

That’s pretty much the clearest statement I’ve seen so far.

Downhearted hot dogs

[via Helen]

Dear Rich People

SFist took a look today at @TechHateCrimes, which documents aggression towards “techies” in various forms, though nobody seems to be able to tell if it’s earnest or a parody. Meanwhile, we were alerted to this bit of analog social media conversation responding to the rich people of the city and the “Gentrifuckation”.

Beau tweets “Found on my way to the Women’s Building last night. Class tension on the rise in SF.” This, like some MM comment threads, could just be one person with a couple of different pens, or a legitimate call and response. No way to tell. Either way it’s graffiti and it’s a crime. I don’t condone crime. I also have problems with the way that this city caters to the rich and has not done enough to reach out to support the residents with less financial means, and is not reacting quickly enough to address the problems that arise when the income gap inflates as quickly as it is right now. People with a lot of money are able to commit crimes that have large scale repercussions and get away with them. The city is reacting swiftly to graffiti vandals, however, by moving to make sure they pay for the damages if caught. Which makes sense, sure. But is graffiti one of the big issues that we, all of us, are dealing with right now? It’s a big issue for property owners, that I understand completely.

I find it understandable that some people can feel like San Francisco doesn’t care about them, that they are not spoken for, not represented, and not cared for by their city. These feelings can leave some people with little hope and little trust that they will be able to truly advocate for themselves by playing by the rules. Unfortunately this drives some people to feel as though they need to write on a utility box to be heard. I wish that wasn’t the case.

Meatloaf